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Tag ‘pints’

Brussels rules on serving wine by the glass?

Saturday, December 24th, 1994
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Myth: Brussels is responsible for a new law forcing hotels and restaurants to serve wine by the glass only in quantities of 125ml or 175ml, or multiples. Wliatsmore each glass has to be lined, with a government-approved stamp, or be served with a government-approved stamped optic.
Source: Financial Times (24 December 1994)

Response: There is absolutely no European legislation which would have any effect on the amounts of alcohol to be served in pubs, bars and so on. This is entirely a matter for the UK Government. The relevant UK legislation is in fact the Weights and Measures (Various Foods) (Amendment) Order 1990, which came into effect on 1 January 1995.

Note for editors:
This story ought not be confused with EU legislation on units of measurement, due to come into effect in the UK this year (see our myth series no. 107). This deals with the way that units of measurement are expressed, and marks the move away from the imperial to the metric system.

EU to ban sales of mixed drink pints in pubs

Sunday, November 27th, 1994
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Myth:  As from 1 October 1995 it will be a criminal offence for a pub to sell mixed drinks such as shandy in a pint.
(The Publican, 21.11.94, Sunday Telegraph, 27.11.94)

Response: Not true. Almost every country in the developed world has adopted the International System of unit measurements (the so-called “metric system”). In 1970 Member States’ national systems were hamionised and with the accession of the UK and Ireland in 1973 a period was granted so that a smooth transition could be made. As it happens the UK was already carrying out its metrification programme at the time. Under Community law (89/617/EEC) the UK’s transition period ends on 31 December 1994, after which the UK needs to have switched over from imperial units. However the Government successfully sought a derogation for the use of the unit “pint” when serving draught beer and draught cider in pubs.

Shandy, then, will technically be allowed to be sold in a pint, but not be called a pint. However UK authorities have said they will offer advice on the rules rather than interpreting them very strictly. This is a decision for the relevant British authorities, just as it would be if they were to declare shandy sold in a pint a criminal offence.

Brussels bans pints of shandy

Monday, November 21st, 1994
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Statement: As from 1 October 1995 it will be a criminal offence for a pub to sell mixed drinks such as shandy in a pint.
Source: The Publican (21 November 1994), Sunday Telegraph (27 November 1994)

Response: Not true. Almost every country in the developed world has adopted the International System of unit measurements (the so-called “metric system”). In 1970 Member States’ national systems were harmonised and with the accession of the UK and Ireland in 1973 a period was granted so that a smooth transition could be made. As it happens the UK was already carrying out its metrification programme at the time. Under Community law (89/617/EEC) the UK’s transition period ends on 31 December 1994, after which the UK needs to have switched over from imperial units. However the Government successfully sought a derogation for the use of the unit “pint” when serving draught beer and draught cider in pubs.

Shandy, then, will technically be allowed to be sold in a pint, but not be called a pint. However UK authorities have said they will offer advice on the rules rather than interpreting them very strictly. This is a decision for the relevant British authorities, just as it would be if they were to declare shandy sold in a pint a criminal offence.

EC in the UK

Check the EC Representation in the UK website

Please note that all statements in all entries were correct on the date of publication given. However, older archived posts are not systematically updated in the light of later developments, for example changes to EU law.

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