Navigation path

Left navigation

Additional tools

Tag ‘advertising’

Swedish Presidency will force a ban on sweet and toy ads

Friday, February 5th, 1999

EU may try to ban sweet and toy ads
Makers of sweets and toys are alarmed at a threat by the European Union to ban television ads for under-12s, and the Advertising Association is launching a campaign to fight it. Campaign reports that a ban is already in place in Sweden, and that the Swedes are expected to try to extend it across Europe when they take up the EU Presidency in 2001. 
(The Times, 5 February 1999, page 38, Trade digest column)

There are no EU plans whatsoever to ban television advertising for sweets and toys. The national policy of a single Member State (in this case Sweden) can in no way be assumed to lead inexorably to EU action. Were the Swedes to make a proposal concerning advertising during their presidency, the proposal would have to gain the support of the other Member State governments. As advertisements for under-12s are not banned in the UK, France, Germany, Italy etc. such a proposal would seem unlikely to succeed.

EU may try to ban sweet and toy ads

Friday, February 5th, 1999

The Times, 5 February 1999, page 38
Makers of sweets and toys are alarmed at a threat by the European Union to ban television ads for under-12s, and the Advertising Association is launching a campaign to fight it. ‘Campaign’ reports that a ban is already in place in Sweden, and that the Swedes are expected to try to extend it across Europe when they take up the EU Presidency in 2001.

There are no EU plans whatsoever to ban television advertising for sweets and toys. The national policy of a single Member State (in this case Sweden) can in no way be assumed to lead inexorably to EU action. Were the Swedes to make a proposal concerning advertising during their presidency, the proposal would have to gain the support of the other Member State governments. As advertisements for under-12s are not banned in the UK, France, Germany, Italy etc. such a proposal would seem unlikely to succeed.

Political parties to be banned from canvassing and advertising

Monday, November 15th, 1993

Myth A clause in a draft EC privacy Directive allowing personal data in the public domain to be used for direct mailing was recently deleted at the request of the applicant Scandinavian countries and may lead to political parties being banned from canvassing and sending direct mail to voters.
(The Guardian, p.l, 15.11.93)

Response: This is not the case. The proposed Directive on the Protection of Personal Data, an initiative aimed at protecting EC citizens from the sale of information about themselves, was drawn up by the European Commission following the opinion from the European Parliament last March and is still being discussed.
The European Commission has no intention of banning the practices described above, although political parties will have to conform with the general obligation to inform the persons concerned about the collection of sensitive information about themselves. Political parties are exempt from having to notify the supervisory authority about the processing of data concerning their members and persons who have regular contact with them, on condition that data is not disclosed to third parties without consent. Similarly third parties disclosing data to political parties will have to inform the persons involved beforehand and to give them the possibility of opting-out.
It should also be noted that discussions with the EFTA countries, including those in Scandanavia, have not influenced this question in any way and that, as is the case with all EC legislation, national ministers will have the last say.

EC in the UK

Check the EC Representation in the UK website

Please note that all statements in all entries were correct on the date of publication given. However, older archived posts are not systematically updated in the light of later developments, for example changes to EU law.

Share buttons

Twitter feeds

Comments

We welcome your comments. They will be moderated. Please keep to the topic and use respectful language.

Archives