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Q&A with Kenny Ewan

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In this week’s column from June’s Entrepreneur in Residence (EiR), we go head-to-head with Kenny Ewan of WeFarm to find out why he decided to step out on his own, whether he had that ‘lightbulb moment’ and how he secured the funding to finance his start up.

Why did you set up your company?

I spent many years working with isolated, indigenous communities in Peru and saw first-hand the grassroots innovation and ideas they were creating to solve challenges. However, I also saw that there was a huge discrepancy in the way this knowledge was shared, and information in general was accessed, in the developing world compared to the massive trend towards decentralization of knowledge and peer to peer sharing in the Western world driven by the internet. In 2009 I was offered the chance to be part of the Cafedirect Producers’ Foundation (CPF – A UK registered charity working with small-scale farmers around the world) start-up team with Claire Rhodes. We put our ideas and experiences together to design the first version of what would become WeFarm.

When did you set up your business, and how long did it take?

we farm 2WeFarm launched as a social enterprise in January 2015, and we launched the product one month later in Kenya.  We had previously been piloting and developing WeFarm as a CPF project for several years before taking the step to launch and scale as a social business – we felt this was a much more scalable and sustainable model.

We developed the product with farming communities in Peru, Kenya and Tanzania which I think was unbelievably beneficial – it meant that we developed something that people on the ground find useful and actually want to use!

Did you have a ‘lightbulb moment’ that led to you starting your business, or which triggered a change in the way you did things?

I think the path to WeFarm being launched was more of a gradual coming together of ideas, experiences and pilots than a single lightbulb moment. However, there have a few special moments along the way. I would pick out the first international test we did with farmers in Peru and Kenya as a great WeFarm moment… I was with a group of rural farmers in Peru as the first messages came in from Kenya, and it was amazing to see people’s reaction to receiving key information from the other side of the world, all in their own language and without internet. That was the moment I knew we had something of huge potential on our hands.

Where did you source funding to set up your business?

WeFarm initially was developed and tested under the UK charity Cafedirect Producers’ Foundation (CPF) and received grant funding from Nominet Trust and Knight Foundation. Then, in 2014 we won the Google Impact Challenge Award. The prize money enabled us to put our plans to launch WeFarm at scale as a social enterprise into action.

In 2015 we were part of the Wayra accelerator programme in London, which included investment into WeFarm.

Were there any EU, national, regional or local business support services, programmes or funding initiatives that helped you set up or grow?

The Wayra accelerator programme was very valuable in getting business support, coaching, mentoring, and certainly  a lot of practice in how to pitch! We have also been part of the Ideas From Europe initiative run by the European Commission over the last few months. This has helped us gain a bit of exposure on the European stage, and culminated in a talk at TEDxBinnenhof, which was very exciting.

With hindsight, which would have been the single most valuable skill to have before setting up your business?

I’d say pitching and public speaking. It’s not necessarily fair that startup businesses are judged on a two or three minute ‘pitch’, but that is the reality. There is no doubt that the startups who can tell a great story and capture people’s imagination in a pitch find themselves with lots more opportunities across PR, funding and entry into different events.

Ultimately you obviously need to have substance behind it to succeed, but I’d certainly advise startup founders to practice, practice and practice their pitch. Or be brave enough to know it’s not your thing, and find a partner who can.

About Kenny

Kenny-Ewan 2Kenny is CEO of WeFarm, a pioneering social enterprise, scaling a unique peer-to-peer knowledge-sharing platform for the 450 million small-scale farmers around the world with no access to the internet. After graduating from the University of Dundee, Kenny went to Peru in 2002 to work on sustainable development projects with indigenous communities. He loved the country so much that he decided to stay. In 2007, he became Peru’s Country Director for ProWorld Service Corps. This international development NGO specialises in projects for isolated, indigenous communities. He returned to the UK in 2009 to join the Cafedirect Producers Foundation (CPF) start-up team. He designed and managed all of CPF’s international projects across East Africa and Latin America.

A social entrepreneur’s guide to scaling in rural areas

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In this week’s column from this month’s Entrepreneur in Residence (EiR), Kenny Ewan of WeFarm sets out his tips for how social entrepreneurs working in hard-to-reach communities can scale-up

Many social enterprises focus on providing services and products for people who live in rural parts of the world. However, having a target market of rural communities comes with many challenges. Typically these people are very difficult to reach, both in person and through marketing. So how does one begin to promote products and services to isolated communities of people, and how do you scale in remote parts of the world?

WeFarm female farmer

In 12 months we have grown our network to more than 63,000 smallholder farmers in Kenya, Uganda, and Peru. Our network WeFarm enables these farmers to access vital information through SMS. The majority of the farmers using our service live in very isolated areas, miles away from the nearest village, without an internet connection and without access to any traditional forms of communication.

Working with these farmers as our main customer base has come with its challenges, but we have achieved excellent growth through persistence and hard work. Here are a few lessons that we’ve learned that we think might help anyone trying to make a difference with rural populations.

Involve customers in the design process

As we were developing WeFarm, we did a lot of work testing the concept with farmers and we tried to involved them in the design process as much as possible. Initially, we wanted to create an internet platform or an app, but the reality on the ground was that most people have basic feature phones, so we ended up creating a service that allows people to crowdsource information even through SMS.

WeFarm Press Photo 4

Without spending time with our future customers it’s highly likely that we would have created a working product that nobody wanted to use. My advice would be to get out there and work with the people you want to empower. Be agile, try lots of different things, find flaws, and create something that is actually useful for your customers!

Marketing to rural communities

Marketing to rural communities has been one of our biggest challenges as a social enterprise. The majority of the small-scale farmers that use WeFarm are located in remote areas with no internet access, and have limited access to other traditional forms of media, which can make it more difficult for us to achieve the same exponential growth rate as other technology businesses.

However, a lot of WeFarm’s success so far has been based on achieving great growth in this challenging environment by trying many different forms of marketing in order to reach the people we need to. The majority of successful sign-ups to our service come from radio shows, or educational programmes run in conjunction with farming co-operatives.

Other things that we have tried include local youth training programmes, partnerships models, newspaper advertising, and many more.

Seek local expertise

WeFarm female farmer pictureRecognising where you need local expertise is very important when working with rural communities. There are so many differences between regions in each country and, as a team, we are constantly encountering situations where we require the expertise of locals.

For example, with our recent launch in Uganda, we found a part-time member of staff who speaks Luganda to help us translate training materials and run workshops with farmers. Seize these opportunities where you need local advice – don’t pretend you have all the answers.

There are huge populations of people living in rural areas of the world. Often this means that social enterprises targeting these audiences fail to scale quickly enough and it’s a tragedy because these customers desperately need new innovative products and services!

But there is hope: you can scale a business in rural areas. My advice to social entrepreneurs: 1) Do your research; 2) Try hard and fail fast; and 3) Find the magic marketing activities that work for you.

About Kenny

Kenny-Ewan 2Kenny is CEO of WeFarm, a pioneering social enterprise, scaling a unique peer-to-peer knowledge-sharing platform for the 450 million small-scale farmers around the world with no access to the internet. After graduating from the University of Dundee, Kenny went to Peru in 2002 to work on sustainable development projects with indigenous communities. He loved the country so much that he decided to stay. In 2007, he became Peru’s Country Director for ProWorld Service Corps. This international development NGO specialises in projects for isolated, indigenous communities. He returned to the UK in 2009 to join the Cafedirect Producers Foundation (CPF) start-up team. He designed and managed all of CPF’s international projects across East Africa and Latin America.

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